*Hold on
Sometimes u just have to push urself !
*Hold on
+
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
likeafieldmouse:

Arshile Gorky - Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia
"Between 1931 and 1934, Gorky made a series of more than eighty drawings and two paintings that he titled Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia. The inspiration for this important body of work came from Giorgio de Chirico’s 1914 painting The Fatal Temple [last image of the above set]. 
De Chirico’s mysterious painting, with its suggestion of the joy and suffering of the mother-and-son relationship, must have resonated with Gorky, who had by this time begun two important works on the theme of the artist and his mother.
With its interlocking shapes, shallow, Cubist-derived space, and compartmentalized imagery, the series represents a distinct departure from Gorky’s earlier experiments with the techniques and motifs of Cézanne and other modern masters.
Nighttime, Enigma and Nostalgia moved farther and farther from De Chirico’s work as it progressed, to the point where the two paintings on the theme can be considered among the most original of Gorky’s early accomplishments.”
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killianflavour:

New Finnish stamps
Design Timo Berry
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coreybartlesanderson:

close up of an installation, steve jobs
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type-lover:

Troika Lenticular posterby joonghyun cho
type-lover:

Troika Lenticular posterby joonghyun cho
type-lover:

Troika Lenticular posterby joonghyun cho
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svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
svdp:

Literal rock band icons by design group Tata & Friends - see how many you can name before reading the title.
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zeroing:

Jean Paul Bourdier
zeroing:

Jean Paul Bourdier
zeroing:

Jean Paul Bourdier
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moshita:

Surgically Altered Ceramics
The installation takes the form of an observation of a surgical experiment in progress. The ‘surgeon’ is dissecting the craft object to see what is within. He finds craft through and through. He tries the experiment again and again, piling up the dissected work, hoping to see something different but it is always the same.
Beccy Ridsdel 
moshita:

Surgically Altered Ceramics
The installation takes the form of an observation of a surgical experiment in progress. The ‘surgeon’ is dissecting the craft object to see what is within. He finds craft through and through. He tries the experiment again and again, piling up the dissected work, hoping to see something different but it is always the same.
Beccy Ridsdel 
moshita:

Surgically Altered Ceramics
The installation takes the form of an observation of a surgical experiment in progress. The ‘surgeon’ is dissecting the craft object to see what is within. He finds craft through and through. He tries the experiment again and again, piling up the dissected work, hoping to see something different but it is always the same.
Beccy Ridsdel 
moshita:

Surgically Altered Ceramics
The installation takes the form of an observation of a surgical experiment in progress. The ‘surgeon’ is dissecting the craft object to see what is within. He finds craft through and through. He tries the experiment again and again, piling up the dissected work, hoping to see something different but it is always the same.
Beccy Ridsdel 
moshita:

Surgically Altered Ceramics
The installation takes the form of an observation of a surgical experiment in progress. The ‘surgeon’ is dissecting the craft object to see what is within. He finds craft through and through. He tries the experiment again and again, piling up the dissected work, hoping to see something different but it is always the same.
Beccy Ridsdel 
+
artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]
artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]
artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]
artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]
artchipel:

Bing Wright (b.1958, USA) - Broken Mirror/Evening Sky (2012)
Broken Mirror/Evening Sky is a new series of striking landscape photographs by New York based artist Bing Wright. Departing from his usual pared down images in grey palettes, Wright offers us moving skyscape photographs of richly colored sunsets reflected onto broken mirrors. This new body of work marks his first return to color photography in almost a decade.
The images are meticulously constructed through a combination of traditional documentary landscape photographs and the subtle manipulations of an image in the studio. Wright photographs sunsets, then projects the images onto mirrors he has broken in the studio. The mirrors are small, measuring just 14 x 11 inches. The artist re-photographs the reflection and then enlarges the image into a large scale format. This beautiful series incorporates Wright’s recurring themes of abstraction and representation – a contrast he masterfully balances by grounding these shards of images into a bold structure. While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (src. James Harris Gallery)
© All images courtesy the artist
[more Bing Wright | artist found at mymodernmet]